Burundian refugees in Tanzania – in pictures

More than 250,000 people have fled Burundi since it descended into violence one year ago. At least a quarter of those now live in Nyarugusu, on the extreme NW Tanzanian border with Burundi. The world’s third largest refugee settlement, it hosts more than 140,000 people – three times the number it was built to house

Map from Centers for Disease Control

http://www.cdc.gov/immigrantrefugeehealth/images/profiles/congolese-map.jpg

In the Guardian online: April 23, 2016

All photographs by Phil Moore/Oxfam

Only some examples below (captions below pictures):


Burundian refugees stand among makeshift shelters in Nyarugusu camp. Their country is trapped in a deadly political crisis, with months of violence triggered by President Pierre Nkurunziza’s decision to run for a third term. Most refugees have travelled at night to avoid being hunted down by security forcesBurundian refugees stand among makeshift shelters in Nyarugusu camp. Their country is trapped in a deadly political crisis, with months of violence triggered by President Pierre Nkurunziza’s decision to run for a third term. Most refugees have travelled at night to avoid being hunted down by security forces.

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Justine Ndizigeyemana, 47, in Nyarugusu. Her husband was shot in their home in Burundi in 2005, and she was raped by soldiers, from whom she contracted an STI that she is still being treated for.

She says she has been a refugee throughout her life, repeatedly leaving Burundi during conflicts in the 70s and 90s. When she arrived at Nyarugusu, she took in two orphans to look after alongside her own children, but she is worried for the future as she doesn’t have any money.

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Tausi Rajabu, 44, has had a mastectomy for breast cancer, and still has chemotherapy. Doctors say she must avoid sick people, but she shares her room with a woman who has typhoid and malaria.

Tausi was born a refugee in DRC in 1972; her father was killed in Burundi, forcing her mother to flee. She has repeatedly relocated, due to civil wars. Back in Burundi, she got involved in women’s rights. The day she left Bujumbura, her neighbour had warned her to go as police were in the area and had killed another neighbour. She had to leave without her five children and has not heard from them since.

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Last October, in an effort to ease overcrowding, the UNHCR began relocating some refugees to other camps in north-western Tanzania, including Nduta: this camp is now home to 55,000 people.

Godrieve Ndengakurio, 30, prepares lunch in a rudimentary kitchen next to her tent in the Nduta camp.

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Nduyimana Gloriose, 21, with her one-month-old son, Iriho Brian Kelly, outside their tent in Nduta. Nduyimana arrived in the camp when she was pregnant with Iriho, her first child, three months ago. after fleeing her home in Burundi. Heavily pregnant at the time, she used to have to walk for an hour to fetch water.

Camps around the region, in Tanzania, Rwanda, Uganda and the DRC, are seriously overcrowded and short of food. According to the UN, an appeal for funds has raised only £1 in every £10 needed.

LINK to full article in the Guardian

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